Motion Reproduction

Spray-painting robot manipulators installed in carmaker factories possess the capacity to reproduce motions previously taught by humans. MotionLab has developed a similar capacity in vehicles. At the end of a motion execution, the vehicle outputs a file, a motion-log file that adequately describes the motion. A vehicle can reproduce the original motion by referencing the file. The motion-reproducing vehicle can be different from the one that created the original motion. We can send a motion-log file to any vehicle so that it can reproduce the original motion.

[1] Reproducing Pull Motion

The following two videos show how Andrew Harding teaches a motion to the Swan robot using “pulling” and how the Swan robot reproduces the original motion.

Andrew Harding “pulls” the Swan robot.

The robot outputs a motion-log file
at the end of the execution.

The Swan robot reproduces the original motion using the motion-log file.

[2] Reproducing Slalom by Push Motion

Daniel Harding teaches a slalom movement
to the Swan robot using “pushing.”

The robot outputs a motion-log file
at the end of the execution.

The Swan robot reproduces the original
slalom motion using the motion-log file.

[3] Reproducing Push-Pull Motion

A user can make a combined motion with “push” and “pull.” The Swan robot can also reproduce this motion.

Andrew teaches the Swan robot
a push-pull motion.

The robot outputs a motion-log file
at the end of the execution.

The Swan robot reproduces
the original push-pull motion
using the motion-log file.

[4] Backward Motion Reproduction

So far, the Swan robot reproduces all of the sample motions forward. That means the original and reproduced motions execute in the same temporal order. However, Symmetric Geometry can reproduce a motion backward as well:

Kori Kanayama commands the Swan robot
by showing her hand.
At the end of the teaching session,
the robot reproduces
the original motion backward.

In this movement,
Swan uses the omega motion mode.